Hassan II Mosque, Casablanca

Completed in 1993, the Hassan II Mosque in Casablanca was designed by French Architect Michel Pinseau.  It is the fifth largest mosque in the world and sports the tallest minaret.  The intricate details etched into the mosque’s columns and arches invite visitors to stroll the grounds to get a closer look. I had three days … Continue reading

1111, Herzog and de Meuron

Swiss architectural demigods Herzog and de Meuron completed 1111 last year. The parking garage sits at the end of Lincoln Road, the walking mall designed by the legendary Miami architect Morris Lapidus, who was criticized in his day for introducing too many  curvy flourishes.  Now it’s Herzog & de Meuron’s turn to go up against … Continue reading

Oscar Niemeyer’s Forgotten Masterpiece

In 1963 Oscar Niemeyer was awarded the commission for the Tripoli Fairgrounds in Lebanon.  Work on the 10,000 hectacre site was halted in 1975 when the civil war erupted.  Today the grounds are quasi public, with a solitary guard manning a low metal gate.  Typical of much of Niemeyer’s work, the outlying reinforced concrete structures … Continue reading

B018: Bernard Khoury

Beirut’s most legendary club is literally underground, on the site of the Karantina massacre.  Bernard Khoury, a native of Beirut, knows his city’s history well, having lived through the civil war that raged from 1975-1990.  His first built project was an immediate success, it’s subterranean metaphor not lost on the throngs of Beirutis flocking to … Continue reading

Le Gray Hotel, Beirut

Beirut has been in the process of rebuilding for twenty years.  Once known as the “Paris of the Middle East,” the city’s center was gutted by fifteen years of civil war that dragged on until 1990.  From the ashes of downtown was born Solideire, a mixed-use development of tony addresses fathered by Rafiq Hariri.  Had … Continue reading

Time-Life

My first meeting with an editor at Time was in September 2001.  The photo editor was Mary Anne Golon.  We met in her twenty-fourth floor office, every wall filled with images from famous photographers, all signed and dedicated to Mary Anne.  She took about an hour to talk to me about the box of contact … Continue reading

Landmarked Interiors

The good folks at Metropolis gave me a demanding assignment:  photograph at least five landmarked interiors in New York in a short time.  We decided on seven locations to scout initially.  It took a few days to get snapshots of what was immediately accessible.  Of the initial seven locations, only four made the final edit. … Continue reading

Welcome to Architographer

Built  in 1913 by Cass Gilbert for Frank W. Woolworth, it was the original “Cathedral of Commerce,” paid for in cash by Woolworth. By phone from Washington D.C., President Woodrow Wilson turned the lights on in what was at the time the tallest building in the world (792 ft.). With terra-cotta tiles hung from a … Continue reading